About the Project

Every member of the VECTOR team is motivated to create a more sustainable and environmentally conscious world. We come from a diverse range of backgrounds, representing a range of society.

 

Introduction

Approach

Impact

FAQs

Project introduction

The EU set out its goals for decarbonisation in the EU Green Deal, which include achieving Net Zero by 2050, and reducing net greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030 (compared to 1990 levels).

Ensuring that the supply of renewable energy needed to achieve these goals is met will require a sharp increase in production, and a more responsible use, of critical raw materials. Whilst recycling can provide an increasing portion of these materials, recycling alone cannot meet the projected demand, which implies that further mining will be required if the EU is to meet its climate goals.

Sourcing raw materials from inside the EU, where suitable environmental, social, and political regulations could be implemented, may be instrumental in securing an ethical provision of metals. However, mineral projects face complex challenges in the EU.

These challenges include the:

\

Technical

for example, we need a precise knowledge of the whereabouts of subsurface mineral deposits on the continent.

\

Environmental

for example, we need to develop the least invasive forms of exploration to minimise impacts to the environment.

\

Social

for example, there is a lack of social acceptance of mineral exploration across Europe.

The purpose of the VECTOR project is to explore these challenges. The consortium of 18 partners aims to understand the origin, connections, and complexities of the challenges, and consequently to develop solutions that may be used to address them. A major objective is to include all stakeholders, including the often overlooked and underappreciated general public, in a dialogue about the sourcing of critical raw materials within Europe.
The project partners will investigate potential solutions that incorporate as many perspectives as possible, address environmental concerns, and solve technical challenges. This will result in pathways towards sustainable, responsible mineral exploration in Europe, which can serve as a reference for the rest of the world.”

Approach

This will result in pathways towards sustainable, responsible mineral exploration in Europe, which can serve as a reference for the rest of the world.

Social science

To move forwards with the EU Green Deal we must understand society’s perception of the extraction of critical raw materials from the Earth. Research within VECTOR will assess how individuals balance the ethical, social, economic, political, and environmental consequences of sourcing critical raw materials. The aim of this is to understand how values impact attitudes, decisions, and acceptance of policy.

Using surveys, VECTOR aims to identify and improve the implementation of these essential values in business to develop long lasting impact that centres on your interests. This will be performed through the development of tools such as a ‘Social Acceptance index’ that can be communicated easily and clearly to decision makers, allowing them to quickly understand the impact of future actions.

Developing continued professional development platforms for geoscientists to better understand wider society’s perception of their work.

Creating curriculum-facing materials to better inform those in education.

Attending science and arts festivals to directly inform and discuss with the public the importance of critical raw materials in the green transition.

Geoscience

We are investigating mineral deposits at three locations across Europe. Each deposit contains a range of critical raw materials needed for the green transition. Our study locations are the Irish Midlands, Kuperschiefer (Germany), and Jadar (Serbia). At each of these locations we will be using non-disruptive technologies to investigate and map the Earth’s subsurface in 3D.

Taken together, these methods will allow scientists to use low-cost, portable and minimally disruptive technologies to analyse the subsurface and determine if they are close to a useful mineral deposit. This represents a marked improvement from traditional exploration techniques, and limits the need for activities such as extensive drilling, which may disrupt both the local environment and communities.

 

Integration

We understand that very few people are experts in both geoscience and social science – none of the VECTOR team are either, and that is why we have specialists in both fields.

 

To ensure that our findings are understandable for all, and we can provide information that addresses the full scale of the issue, we aim to integrate both sides of our analyses. Using the data that we collect, we will develop a single interface that allows all of our findings to be accessed by anyone, in one place and in an easy-to-understand format, helping you to become more informed about the current state of affairs.

 

Impact

We have developed 5 dimensions of impact that will guide our approach to project outcomes and impact
creation. These can be understood as values that will shape the outputs of the project by focusing
the consortium on the impact we want to make. The dimensions are:

The dimensions of impact can be understood as values that will shape the outputs of the project by focusing the consortium on the impact we want to make.

FAQ

B
C
Is the VECTOR project pro-mining?

VECTOR is neither for nor against mining. The aim of the VECTOR project is to better understand societal responses to exploration for critical raw materials within the EU, to integrate these views and concerns for the environment with scientific solutions, and to develop products that can be used to enable sustainable, responsible exploration for critical raw materials within the EU.

The VECTOR Consortium partners are aware that many people view mineral exploration and mining as societally damaging industries, and may consider themselves anti-mining. There is no question that there have been instances where the mining industry has caused considerable environmental and societal damage and unfortunately some projects continue this reprehensible legacy. However, given that recycling alone cannot supply the materials required for the EU to meet its climate goals, the mining of critical raw materials will be required, combined with extensive efforts to reduce overall consumption, and additional research and development into circular economy technologies. We believe that, within this context, modern mineral exploration and mining must be carried out to the highest standards that greatly minimise environmental and societal impacts.

Some wealthy societies have chosen to outsource raw material production to minimise environmental and social disturbance. However, this raises questions of environmental justice and how the societal costs and benefits of mining are distributed across the globe.

B
C
Does the VECTOR consortium include mining companies?

The VECTOR consortium comprises a large variety of stakeholders, including research organisations, social and environmental consultants, technology start-ups, not-for-profit organisations, and mining companies. It is essential to involve mining companies in the project, as not only do these companies have practical and technical working knowledge of exploration methods, local community engagement, and site working practices, but they are key to providing geological data, information, and access* to the study sites that will be the focus of the Project.

However, it is important to note that the mining companies involved in the project have the same status as the other consortium partners, and are not involved in the management or governance of the Project. As explained in our Ethics Commitment, the VECTOR project seeks to take a human-centred approach to fulfilling the Project’s aims, which involves all stakeholders, including the general public. We have put processes in place to ensure that the Project meets its commitment to maintaining high ethical standards in its conduct and outcomes.

B
C
Does the VECTOR project seek to influence public views on critical raw material exploration within Europe?

VECTOR does not seek to change or improve the social acceptance, or broader public views, on mineral exploration within Europe. Rather, it aims to understand how current public attitudes are formed and provide data tools that can be utilised by all members of society, from governments to NGOs to companies, to understand these attitudes and integrate them within assessments and decision making concerning mineral exploration within Europe. The aim is to inform rather than influence; to encourage critical thinking; and to stimulate public debate about the need for critical raw materials and their role in Europe’s success in meeting the decarbonisation targets set out in the Green Deal.

The VECTOR consortium has appointed an Ethics Advisor and Independent Ethics Committee to oversee the conduct and outcomes of the Project and ensure that the Project progresses in line with its purpose, as set out in the Statement of Purpose.

B
C
Will the VECTOR project use machine learning?

Machine Learning will be used within VECTOR solely to find common patterns in the data that we collect in our core research, be this geological data or survey data about social acceptance of extracting critical raw materials. This allows us to better see links between these data sets and integrate the two different sides of our research.

The VECTOR consortium has appointed an Ethics Advisor and Independent Ethics Committee to oversee the conduct and outcomes of the Project, and ensure that the Project progresses in line with its purpose, as set out in the Statement of Purpose.

B
C
How will the VECTOR project ensure that the research conducted during the project, including that involving engagement with external stakeholders, is conducted to the highest ethical standards?

The VECTOR consortium has appointed an Ethics Advisor and Independent Ethics Committee to oversee the conduct and outcomes of the Project, and ensure that the Project progresses in line with its purpose, and with the highest ethical standards. To find out more about the ethical governance of the project, please click here.

“This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon Europe research and innovation programme under grant agreement nº 101058483
Co-funded by the European Union. 
Views and opinions expressed are however those of the author(s) only and do not necessarily reflect those of the European Union or Horizon Europe research and innovation programme. Neither the European Union not the granting authority can be held responsible for them.”